distance and procedure

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bravn
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Joined: Thu Jul 16, 2020 10:19 pm

distance and procedure

Postby bravn » Thu Jul 16, 2020 11:00 pm

Hello

Is a laser reading taken when an approaching car is 600 meters away from a stationary police vehicle, as accurate as a laser reading taken closer to the same police vehicle?
I was issued an infringement notice after arriving at my destination (my local shopping centre, located several kilometers past the police vehicle). As I was exiting my vehicle I looked up to see the same police vehicle I had seen on the side of the road, turn into the shopping centre street and park behind my car. At least their lights weren't on which was less embarrassing I suppose.
Is 600 meters the usual distance for laser?

Thanks

Hardy
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Re: distance and procedure

Postby Hardy » Fri Jul 17, 2020 12:12 am

The laser reading is accurate no matter how far away the target is. The problem is if the target is over a kilometre away you might not be able to identify the object your laser is measuring.

bravn
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Joined: Thu Jul 16, 2020 10:19 pm

Re: distance and procedure

Postby bravn » Fri Jul 17, 2020 12:37 am

Hardy wrote:The laser reading is accurate no matter how far away the target is. The problem is if the target is over a kilometre away you might not be able to identify the object your laser is measuring.

Thank you - If they wanted to identify the approaching target, why not flash the lights and signal for the target to pull over when the target drove past? If they could not identify the target at 600m, why not take another laser reading when the target is closer?
Last edited by bravn on Fri Jul 17, 2020 3:25 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Day
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Re: distance and procedure

Postby Day » Fri Jul 17, 2020 9:50 am

"If they could not identify the target at 600m, why not take another laser reading when the target is closer?"

Because they have the reading already. They can identify the vehicle at that distance by sight. They won't be able to read the rego until closer.

Hardy
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Re: distance and procedure

Postby Hardy » Fri Jul 17, 2020 10:06 am

The infringement notice often states the range when the measurement was taken. In your case I guess it says 600m. That is on the long side, but nothing wrong with it. It sounds like the reading was taken on a long straight road where vehicles were coming over a crest about 700m away. One reason they don't wait until the target vehicle gets closer is because they know drivers slow down the closer they get to a police car stopped on the side of the road. By the time you see a police car stopped on the side of the road you can fairly assume the police have already measured your speed.

bravn
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Joined: Thu Jul 16, 2020 10:19 pm

Re: distance and procedure

Postby bravn » Fri Jul 17, 2020 2:45 pm

Day wrote:"If they could not identify the target at 600m, why not take another laser reading when the target is closer?"

Because they have the reading already. They can identify the vehicle at that distance by sight. They won't be able to read the rego until closer.


okay fair enough, thanks

bravn
Posts: 7
Joined: Thu Jul 16, 2020 10:19 pm

Re: distance and procedure

Postby bravn » Fri Jul 17, 2020 3:21 pm

Hardy wrote:The infringement notice often states the range when the measurement was taken. In your case I guess it says 600m. That is on the long side, but nothing wrong with it. It sounds like the reading was taken on a long straight road where vehicles were coming over a crest about 700m away. One reason they don't wait until the target vehicle gets closer is because they know drivers slow down the closer they get to a police car stopped on the side of the road. By the time you see a police car stopped on the side of the road you can fairly assume the police have already measured your speed.

Yes. I guess I assumed that when the police have measured a car's speed and have determined that the car is speeding, and given the police can identify that car by sight, the police then flash their lights and ask the car to pull over.

Regarding the TIN -
Do I have to answer part (c): intend / do not intend
Will my objection be void if I do not cross out anything on part (c)?

Hardy
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Re: distance and procedure

Postby Hardy » Fri Jul 17, 2020 3:30 pm

You have to state whether you intend to defend or not.

See http://trafficlaw.com.au/fines.html#object

bravn
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Joined: Thu Jul 16, 2020 10:19 pm

Re: distance and procedure

Postby bravn » Fri Jul 17, 2020 3:48 pm

Hardy wrote:You have to state whether you intend to defend or not.

See http://trafficlaw.com.au/fines.html#object


To properly complete the objection form you need to print your name, sign your name and cross out the words "do not intend".
It does not matter whether you cross out "do not intend" or "do intend" as the result will be the same.


I don't know what I should intend because my assumptions to date have been all wrong.
If I cross out "intend" can that be used against me?

NB: Hardy can you please PM me your email address, I can't utilise the "email me" link on the website. Thanks.

Hardy
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Re: distance and procedure

Postby Hardy » Fri Jul 17, 2020 4:04 pm

The only reason the question is on the form is because the legislation requires you to state whether or not you intend to defend. So cross out one of them. The consequences are the same no matter which one you cross out. I wrote a website that explains all that and it seems you've read it, so no need for me to explain it all again.


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